Throw Away Gourmet

Throw Away Gourmet are a group of students from the Glasgow School of Art who regularly come together to strengthen community through the action of preparing and sharing food that would otherwise be thrown away. Using donations raised from these meals we are then able to share food throughout Glasgow. It is a developing student led project that evolves and grows, reaching out to different communities within the city and raising awareness of food wastage through the action of bringing people together to eat.

“It was a lovely evening with some great people, conversation and food”.

The spread included:

Courgette salad
rocket salad
potato wedges
vegetable stew
spicy sausage stew
hasa five spice pork ribs
torteloni with pesto and lime
plum crumble
yoghurt
fruit salad

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Yoghurt Recipe

Recipe shared at our fermentation workshop.  It works best with whole non-homogenised organic milk, like the lovely stuff now being supplied by Locavore from Mossgiel Farm in Ayrshire. The yoghurt can be strained overnight to make cream cheese / labneh, just add a bit of salt, and try mixing the cream cheese with chopped wild garlic. Delicious!

Yoghurt

Natural Yoghurt recipe

From: The Lost Art of Real Cooking by Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger

1 litre of organic whole milk

1 tablespoon natural live organic yoghurt at room temperature

  1. Over a low flame, slowly heat the milk in a non-reactive pot to 180˚F. The milk should reach a hearty scald – hot and foamy but not quite simmering. If you are going to make yoghurt a lot it’s worth buying a cheese thermometer, you can also use a jam thermometer if you have one.
  2. Stir it occasionally as it heats, remembering that the faster you heat the milk, the more grainy bits of overheated congealed protein you’ll find in your yoghurt. When it’s done, pour into large glass jar to cool.
  3. Let it sit until cooled to 110˚F, or cool a bit quicker by placing pan in a cold water. At this point take a spoonful of milk from the jar and mix with a spoonful of live-culture yoghurt, then stir this back in. A tiny amount of yoghurt can culture a large amount of milk, so you really don’t need much, but it’s important that it’s evenly distributed.
  4. Put lid on the jar and place in a cool box wrapped in a tea towel. Fill four other jars with very hot water and put them next to the yoghurt. This creates your incubation chamber. Close the cool box (better described as the warm box) and leave for 12-24 hours. Some people culture their yoghurt in a wide mouthed thermos flask which has the same function of keeping a steady temperature but it is then a bit difficult to transfer yoghurt to the fridge so I prefer to do it in jars.
  5. Don’t disturb the yoghurt too much while it’s culturing. Avoid the temptation of jiggling the pot to see how thick it is! After 12 hours check to see if it’s set and refrigerate. If it’s still not set, refill the jars of hot water and leave for up to another 12 hours.
  6. If you like thick greek yoghurt, then you can strain the yoghurt for an hour or two in a muslin cloth. Remember to save a little yoghurt for making the next batch.

Fermentation Circle

Saturday 9 April, blog by Kristina Nitsolova, photos by Clementine Sandison

It is a wonderful thing to realise how much can be learned in the space of a few hours, even if the subject may be the ancient practice of fermentation (pre-dating agriculture).

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It took an afternoon in the Soil City lab to motivate me to turn all the leftover vegetables (especially cabbage) from the weekly Locavore veg bag into all sorts of delicious sauerkraut experiments and to give rye sourdough bread making another go. Hearing about the different approaches to preserving and preparing food of experienced Glasgow-based ‘fermentators’ made the use of natural fermentation techniques seem less of an aspect of countryside life and more of a possibility for a healthy urban diet.

Some great books to guide the novice as well as those more experienced in the art of fermentation, are available in the Soil City library- The Art of Fermentation and Gut reveal a lot about the principles and health benefits of incorporating more naturally fermented foods into our modern diets.

Not only did we get to taste Clem’s sourdough rye bread, beetroot and cabbage sauerkraut, and yogurts, Martin’s white cabbage and caraway seeds sauerkraut and kombucha, and Lindsay’s allioli but we had a go at making some sauerkraut with seasonal (very aesthetically pleasing) vegetables, and even ferment some wild garlic.
On a personal level participating in the Fermentation Circle was a way to switch off from the politics of our global food system and its ills (which I often find thinking about and discussing) and re-connect with food as a source of nourishment and health when produced/processed/prepared using natural methods- another valuable point of engagement with sustainable food activism, in my opinion.